• Erica Chan

School Employees

Updated: May 20

EDD's FAQ for school employees directly copied and pasted from here.


Is a school employee eligible for Unemployment Insurance benefits during a recess period?

Yes, if you meet any of the following criteria:

  • You have enough non-school wages in the base period to establish a valid claim. A base period is a specific 12-month term that we use to determine if you earned enough wages to establish an Unemployment Insurance (UI) claim.

  • You are available to work for a school employer who has said they may call you to work during the recess period.

  • You do not have reasonable assurance to return to work after the recess period ends.

  • Your employment depends on enrollment, funding, or program changes.


If my school employer notifies me during the recess period that I no longer have a job when the next term begins, am I eligible to receive benefits during the remainder of the recess period?

Yes, you would be considered unemployed through no fault of your own. However, you must meet all other eligibility requirements. When you notify us that you no longer have a job, we will verify with your school employer that they withdrew the offer of employment. You may also be eligible to receive retroactive benefits depending on the type of work you performed.


At the end of the school term, my school employer gave me a return-to-work date for the next school year. Before the term began, I was laid off because my position was eliminated. Am I eligible for benefits?

Yes.


Am I eligible for retroactive benefits?

Yes, if you are a non-professional school employee, or school supportive employee, and meet all the following conditions:

  • You requested retroactive benefits no later than 30 days after the new school term began.

  • You were laid off by the school employer.

  • You were not previously disqualified for benefits (other than reasonable assurance to return to work).

  • You certified for benefits during the recess period.

  • You met all eligibility requirements during the recess period.


What is the difference between a school employee and a school supportive employee?

  • A school employee works for a school employer.

  • A school supportive employee does not work for a school employer, but works for a different employer who provides services to a school employer.


I’m a substitute teacher and my school employer offered me work in the next school year or term. However, I did not receive a definite return-to-work date. Am I still eligible for benefits during the recess period?

  • Generally, no. The school employer is not required to give substitute teachers a definite return-to-work date to establish that there is reasonable assurance to return to work.

  • If you worked as a substitute teacher and the school employer offers you work during the next school year or term under the same general conditions, and you accept the offer, there is reasonable assurance you will return to work.


Before I filed for benefits, my last day of work was at my part-time job for a non-school employer. I also work for a school employer who has offered me work when the recess period ends. Am I eligible for benefits during the recess period?

  • Based on your school wages, you are not eligible to receive benefits during the recess period because you were given reasonable assurance to return to work for a school employer for the next school year.

  • However, if you earned enough wages from your non-school employer to establish a valid claim, you may be eligible for benefits based on these wages, if all other eligibility requirements are met.


  • The offer I received from a school employer for the next year or term depends on sufficient enrollment, funding, or changes in the program. Will I be eligible to receive benefits during the recess period regardless of my classification?

  • Yes. If the offer of work depends on sufficient funding or enrollment, you are not considered to have reasonable assurance for the next school year or term.

  • You are eligible for benefits as long as you meet all other eligibility requirements, whether you are a professional, nonprofessional, or school supportive employee (of a public or nonprofit school).

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